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If Christians stuck to the "red letters" would the world be better off?

Posted: Mon Dec 07, 2020 6:39 am
by Secularick
Strip away the epistles, the Revelation… strip it on down to Jesus' words, commonly printed in red, throughout the four gospels.

Gone would be things like "women cannot teach men," "don't marry because it'll distract you from God," and so many other problematic messages in the writings of, for example, Paul.

And we'd be left with… OK, the red letters still have a lot of interesting stuff in there, but there would be far less distraction from the crux of the message: compassion, empathy, and inclusion.

What do you think?

And given that we've had 2,000 years of the 27 books of the New Testament being repeatedly asserted to be perfect the way it is, would it ever even be possible for Christendom to ever, well, revise its position in the name of a more focused, true-to-Jesus message?

Re: If Christians stuck to the "red letters" would the world be better off?

Posted: Mon Dec 07, 2020 5:42 pm
by twicedouble
Isn’t the “one jot or tittle” verse in the red letters?

Re: If Christians stuck to the "red letters" would the world be better off?

Posted: Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:39 am
by Secularick
Yes, but it refers to the Old Testament; the epistles, within the narrative, didn't exist yet. (Realistically, the epistles were likely written first, but that's not really the point here.)

Edit: It occurs to me you may be pointing out that the red letters contain Jesus' affirmation of the Old Testament, a testament which is, well, filled with questionable material.

And if that's the case... Yeah, you're right. But there are a fair few examples of Old Testament passages brought up in Jesus' life, and he tends to interpret them in the most radical, liberal ways possible, often enough anyways. In a sense, Jesus not only redeems humanity but also the Old Testament. Now, does that mean Jesus is playing as fast and loose with the passages he refers to as other New Testament speakers do when forcing messianic prophecies to fit Jesus' life (or turning non-messianic passages into messianic ones for the sake of bolstering Jesus? Absolutely.

It's problematic the whole way down, but I still remain convinced that a radical reimagining of how churches handle the Bible could have a tremendously positive effect.